She’s been watching out for me for 9 years, and counting

Chey@KSC

December 19, 2003.  I was sitting in the Honolulu airport departure lounge, on my way back home to see my family.  It had been a year since I had last been home, and as excited as I was to be doing that (I love my family), I was more nervous than anything.  That night was the first time I ever talked to Chey on the phone, as I was waiting for my plane to arrive.

By the time I got back to Hawaii and did a short underway, it was my birthday and Chey and I were e-mailing, texting and talking regularly.  My boat had to leave in mid-march for a few months at sea, but it was my turn to stay behind and attend some schools.  With time between schools, Chey was able to come out and spend two weeks in Hawaii with me, having never met me before in person.  She was taking a huge risk on me, but as she’ll say, the moment she first saw me after stepping off the airplane she knew everything was going to be alright.  We had a blast those two weeks, half of the time with her little brother Matt along with us.  We got to see all the sights on Oahu, and really hit it off spectacularly.

She had to get back to Wisconsin for work, and my boat would be returning soon.  However, on a crazy whim, I flew up to meet her family in Watertown the weekend before my boat arrived.  At that point we both knew we needed to do something drastic if we were going to make this work.  I couldn’t just walk out on the Navy, so Chey sold her car and most of her stuff, said goodbye to a great job and great friends and hopped on a plane to Hawaii.

On June 30th, 2004 she moved in with me to the apartment I had just gotten a week before, after I picked her up in the car I had also bought just the week before.  We had a whirlwind of a year after that, with my little sister staying with us for a while, my famliy visiting and us exchanging rings over Thanksgiving that year.

By the summer of 2005, we knew I had a deployment coming up, so in order to make things easier and safer for Chey, we decided to go ahead and make it official.  I didn’t tell my family about it till afterwards (word of advice, not my wisest decision), but we were married on June 30th, 2005.   It’s been quite the road since then, and I couldn’t have done almost any of it without her there to encourage, comfort, and motivate me.  Thanks for hanging in there with me Chey, and here’s to another 100 years or so.  Love ya!

 

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Wiping some dust off.

It’s been about a year since I’ve put anything up here on Ye Olde Blog, so maybe its time for me to take another crack at writing some nonsense. I’ve had a lot of stuff happen over the past year that it wouldn’t hurt to discuss. We’ll see.

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Sunday Sagan 5, Blues for a Red Planet

Our fifth installment of the Cosmos series, Blues for a Red Planet is all about Mars.  Like Carl did in the last episode for Venus, he discusses humanity’s fascination with the bright red planet that appears in our night sky.  H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds helped spark this ‘Mars Madness’ around the turn of the century, along with the observations of Shiapperelli

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Sunday Sagan 4, Heaven and Hell

I missed a week last week for no good reason, but here is episode 4 of Cosmos, Heaven and Hell.  Carl explores the hells on earth that can come from the heavens in the form of comet and meteor impacts on earth.  He speculates on the cause of the Tunguska event in 1908, investigates the history of comet sightings and examines the impacts on our nearest celestial neighbor, the moon.  This episode ends with Venus, with its hellish pressures, temperatures and sulfuric acid rain, our visits to the planet, and what Venus has to say about the greenhouse effect here on earth.  Enjoy!

 

 

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Sunday Sagan 3, Harmony of the Worlds

For thousands of years, stargazers around the world wondered why there were a handful of lights in the sky that did not follow the motions of all the other lights.  Ptolemy in the 2nd century AD came up with the most accurate explanation involving these planets (Greek for wanderers) along with the sun and moon orbiting around the earth, with something called an epicycle to explain why some of the lights sometimes seemed to go backwards in the sky relative to the fixed stars.  When the Christian church became the state religion of the Roman empire, this idea, called geocentrism, became widely known and locked into dogma.  It wasn’t until the wars of the Reformation that the idea that the Earth along with all the other planets instead orbited around the sun.  This idea, written about by a Polish Catholic cleric called Copernicus in Latin, proposed that the planets all followed circular orbits.  Copernicus wisely chose to not have his work published until shortly before his death, as questioning dogma was could get you a visit from the inquisition.

But this heliocentric model was actually a less accurate model for the motions of the planets than the existing Ptolemaic geocentric model.  It took a protestant monk named Kepler to come up with the solution to this confusion, determining that the planets did orbit the sun, but on elliptical orbits, not circular orbits.  And this is what is actually the case.  This episode of Cosmos tells Kepler’s story.  Enjoy!

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Sunday Sagan, Episode 2 : One Voice in the Cosmic Fugue

Damn, these just give me the chills.  Here is the second episode of Cosmos, discussing life in the universe. From the Heiki crab of Japan to the trilobites, from DNA to Miller and Urey, One Voice in the Cosmic Fugue covers the basics of what makes life on earth and wonders what life may be like if it exists elsewhere.

Enjoy!

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Time Minchin Number 7

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